Representative Black Stock Images for the Win

Web designer and front-end developer Kenneth Wiggins brainstormed a new stock photo service. With the help of photographers, he created a site that provides nuanced, non-stereotyped, high-quality images of black people. BlackStockImages (still in beta at this writing) already has over 400 photos in several categories, including food, objects, people, scenery, travel and youth, for example.

Wiggins writes:

“By focusing on respect, authenticity and culture; I’ve built a platform that presents Black culture in a genuine light, leaving the generic visuals and offensive propaganda to the other sites. I believe images used to represent content is as important as what’s written. BlackStock is here to help connect the messaging by providing quality assets for better branding and communication with your audience.”

BlackStockImages, via New Republic.

BlackStockImages, via New Republic.

Found via New Republic.

Because representation in media matters. Because black lives matter.

Reflective, Upside-Down Mural in Lithuania

Artist Ray Bartkus painted a mural on a water-front building in MarijampolÄ—, Lithuania. The trick with this mural is that it’s painted upside down, i.e., meant to be viewable on the surface of the water:

Ray Bartkus Water Mural

Ray Bartkus, via Boredpanda.

Reporting and photo via Boredpanda.

Super! Because sometimes you need to stand on your head (so to speak) to bring things into focus. 🙂

Light Installations Bring a Rainbow of Colors into Spaces

Artist Peter Erskine incorporates laser-cut prisms into existing spaces. He is interested in exploring the interplay of light, space, and architecture. So far Erskine’s work has appeared in and on both modern and historical spaces, with equal success.

Peter Erskine Great Trajanic Hall in Rome

Great Trajanic Hall, Rome, Italy. Peter Erskine.

Peter Erskine Milan Central Station

Milan Central Station, Milan, Italy. Peter Erskine.

Beautiful.

Because light and color can draw the eye into unexpected details and reveal new ways of looking at your surroundings. Because different points of view are what makes the humanity so amazing.

9-Year-Old Designs Scarf-cum-Weather-Chart

Nine-year-old Rebecca Ryan from Seattle thought the summer of 2014 was pretty and warm, not rainy and cold like the reputation of her home town implies. She came up with a craft project to track the daily temperatures in the form of a knitted scarf. She assigned a color to a given temperature range and asked her mother to knit a stripe each day in the correct color.

Seattle weather scarf by Kate and Rebecca Ryan

Kate and Rebecca Ryan; via Komo News.

Seattle weather scarf by Kate and Rebecca Ryan

Kate and Rebecca Ryan; via Komo News.

Found via Komo News, reported by Scott Sistek.

What a great combination: an article of clothing, a craft project and a colorful record of the year’s temperatures! Kudos!

Designing Tech at 90

At 90, Barbara Beskind, after a career in the military and years of design work from toys to inflatable devices that help children with balance issues, is still going strong – and designing away. Ms. Beskind is currently working on solutions that improve the quality of life for older adults.

Barbara Beskind. Photo: Nicolas Zurcher, courtesy of IDEO; found via NPR.

Photo: Nicolas Zurcher, courtesy of IDEO; found via NPR.

For Ms. Beskind, being a designer is a boon because “[i]t makes aging more tolerable, more enjoyable… I enjoy the age I’m in. I think it’s one of the best chapters of my life,” says she in an NPR interview by Laura Sydell.

Kudos!