Reflective, Upside-Down Mural in Lithuania

Artist Ray Bartkus painted a mural on a water-front building in MarijampolÄ—, Lithuania. The trick with this mural is that it’s painted upside down, i.e., meant to be viewable on the surface of the water:

Ray Bartkus Water Mural

Ray Bartkus, via Boredpanda.

Reporting and photo via Boredpanda.

Super! Because sometimes you need to stand on your head (so to speak) to bring things into focus. 🙂

Murals from Trash and Paint

Portuguese artist Artur Bordalo (aka Bordalo II) uses paint and scraps plus various pieces of trash to form huge 3D murals in cityscapes. To highlight just two examples, here is a frog and a raccoon:

Wow! Because looking at trash with fresh eyes is a skill that needs to be treasured!

Light Installations Bring a Rainbow of Colors into Spaces

Artist Peter Erskine incorporates laser-cut prisms into existing spaces. He is interested in exploring the interplay of light, space, and architecture. So far Erskine’s work has appeared in and on both modern and historical spaces, with equal success.

Peter Erskine Great Trajanic Hall in Rome

Great Trajanic Hall, Rome, Italy. Peter Erskine.

Peter Erskine Milan Central Station

Milan Central Station, Milan, Italy. Peter Erskine.

Beautiful.

Because light and color can draw the eye into unexpected details and reveal new ways of looking at your surroundings. Because different points of view are what makes the humanity so amazing.

Snowy Bunny Street Art in Finland

One of Finnish photographer Minna Koponen’s projects involves the unlikely combination of street art, snow and bunnies. During winters 2012 and 2015, Ms. Koponen created these adorable, cartoony outlines of face-plant bunnies out of snow and plastered them on trees, buildings and other public spaces.

Snow bunnies on trees by Minna Koponen

Minna Koponen.

Snow bunnies on a tree by Minna Koponen

Minna Koponen.

Snow bunny on the side of a building by Minna Koponen

Minna Koponen.

Ms. Koponen calls her creations Crash Test Bunnies, and aims to create good cheer and to bring something surprising and refreshing to the urban environment. There are more photos on her site.

Because art need not be stuffy nor elitistic! (And bunnies rule!)

Autism and Photography

To document the often bizarre and incomprehensible world of his son, photographer Timothy Archibald has been photographing his autistic son Elijah from age 5. It started with taking photos of the repetitive behaviors or rituals that Elijah exhibited. Then it turned into something more:

“When Archibald showed him a photo of one of his behaviors, Elijah suggested doing it in another way or another place. Both father and son were very interested in the process through which they could get a good photo. ‘We had this mutual sense of discovery,’ Archibald says.”

Elijah has in time become a more active participant, helping to brainstorm and set up the photoshoots. Mr. Archibald named the project Echolilia. These photograph sessions sound transformative for them, because through them

“…father and son create their own visual language, thanks to which they can communicate with each other even when there are no words they both can understand. In fact, Elijah receives positive attention for his rituals, can share something with his dad, and has even started to take his own photos.”

Autism Photos Timothy Archibald

Timothy Archibald.

Autism Photo2 Timothy Archibald

Timothy Archibald.

More Echolilia photos on Mr. Archibald’s website. Reporting via SNAP and Lomography.

Because communication matters. Because making a connection with other people matters.