Seniors as Calendar Stars, Take 2

Inspired by the hugely popular calendar featuring German seniors, Senior Living Communities in the U.S. has created their own version. Again, seniors recreated scenes from movies with dazzling results:

Charlie's Angels Senior Living Communities

Senior Living Communities.

Ghost Busters Senior Living Communities

Senior Living Communities.

Star Wars Senior Living Communities

Senior Living Communities.

Again, because you don’t just stop thinking, dreaming, laughing or existing when you get older.

Bookish Benches in London

In London, benches celebrating landmark books were unveiled in July 2014. These fifty benches are a part of Books About Town, a literacy campaign by Wild In Art and the National Literacy Trust.

London Bench War Horse by Michael Morpurgo

‘War Horse’ by Michael Morpurgo; image vie BBC America.

London Bench The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

‘The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe’ by C.S. Lewis; image vie BBC America.

London Bench The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

‘The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes’ by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; image vie BBC America.

All images via BBC America.

Because public spaces can inspire and uplift. Because stories and books matter!

What You See Is What You Expect

Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook and founder of LeanIn.Org, has launched a campaign to change images of girls and women used in advertising. LeanIn.org teamed up with Getty Images to create a photo library called the Lean In Collection. According to Ms. Sandberg, the collection portrays working moms, military women and bosses, with

“real bodies, real families, raising real children … and also includes men in the home who have chosen to be primary caregivers.”

Pamela Grossman, director of Visual Trends at Getty, says: “Imagery is so powerful. It’s what changes your expectation of yourself and the world around us.” But that’s not all. According to ABC News,

“[h]aving more equal and more progressive images of females is [...] also about economics,” says Grossman. “Women hold so much buying power – certainly in the US and growing worldwide – so it’s foolish not to figure out how to speak to women in a relevant and respectful way.”

Kudos, Getty Images and LeanIn.org. Women are not just someone’s daughters, sisters or wives. Women are someone, too.

 

Ramping It Up

Beautiful and functional accessibility from Belgium:

Found via Proferssor Robert Harris on Twitter.

Because access matters, and providing access in an aesthetically pleasing way is a very nice bonus.

How the Internet Makes Being An Introvert Easier

In an article about disclosure when writing online, author Roxane Gay includes the following explanation of what being an introvert online means to her:

“For me, one of the biggest draws of the Internet has always been how I can be alone and yet find connection with other people. I am an introvert. I can fake extroversion, but it is exhausting. I prefer quiet, even when I am happily around other people. I spend an inordinate amount of time in my head. Online, I can be in my head and with interesting people. I can be alone but feel less lonely.”

A fantastic explanation! Because, in general, introverts do not hate people (that’s misanthropy), nor do they fear social encounters (that’s shyness). Because introverts are not bogeymen.

Author: Representation Matters

Author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie gives voice to Nigerian and American life, telling stories about moral responsibility, the end of colonialism, ethnic allegiances, class and race, and love and hatred. I was struck by two quotes attributed to her:

Chimamanda Ngozi AdichieChimamanda Ngozi AdichieChimamanda Ngozi Adichie quotes from nneckbone on Tumblr.

Because stereotyping in media hurts real people. Because representation matters.